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dc.contributor.authorOvergaard, Hans J.
dc.contributor.authorOlano, Víctor Alberto
dc.contributor.authorJaramillo, Juan Felipe
dc.contributor.authorMatiz, María Inés
dc.contributor.authorSarmiento, Diana
dc.contributor.authorStenström, Thor Axel
dc.contributor.authorNeal, Alexander
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-13T14:57:48Z
dc.date.available2019-09-13T14:57:48Z
dc.identifier.issn1756-3305spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12495/1683
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherBioMed Centralspa
dc.relation.ispartofseriesParasites & Vectors, 1756-3305, Vol. 10, Nro, 356, 2017p. 1-12spa
dc.relation.urihttps://parasitesandvectors.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13071-017-2295-1spa
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleA cross-sectional survey of Aedes aegypti immature abundance in urban and rural household containers in central Colombiaspa
dc.typearticlespa
dc.type.localartículospa
dc.subject.decsVirus del denguespa
dc.subject.decsControl de mosquitosspa
dc.subject.decsInsectosspa
dc.subject.keywordsAedes aegyptispa
dc.subject.keywordsImmature stagesspa
dc.subject.keywordsHousehold water containerspa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1186/s13071-017-2295-1spa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.publisher.journalParasites & Vectorsspa
dc.identifier.instnameinstname:Universidad El Bosquespa
dc.identifier.reponamereponame: Repositorio Institucional Universidad El Bosquespa
dc.identifier.repourlrepourl:https://repositorio.unbosque.edu.cospa
dc.description.abstractenglishBackground Aedes aegypti, the major vector of dengue, breeds in domestic water containers. The development of immature mosquitoes in such containers is influenced by various environmental, ecological and socioeconomic factors. Urban and rural disparities in water storage practices and water source supply may affect mosquito immature abundance and, potentially, dengue risk. We evaluated the effect of water and container characteristics on A. aegypti immature abundance in urban and rural areas. Data were collected in the wet season of 2011 in central Colombia from 36 urban and 35 rural containers, which were either mosquito-positive or negative. Immature mosquitoes were identified to species. Data on water and container characteristics were collected from all containers. Results A total of 1452 Aedes pupae and larvae were collected of which 81% were A. aegypti and 19% A. fluviatilis. Aedes aegypti immatures were found in both urban and rural sites. However, the mean number of A. aegypti pupae was five times higher in containers in the urban sites compared to those in the rural sites. One of the important factors associated with A. aegypti infestation was frequency of container washing. Monthly-washed or never-washed containers were both about four times more likely to be infested than those washed every week. There were no significant differences between urban and rural sites in frequency of washing containers. Aedes aegypti immature infestation was positively associated with total dissolved solids, but negatively associated with dissolved oxygen. Water temperature, total dissolved solids, ammonia, nitrate, and organic matter were significantly higher in urban than in rural containers, which might explain urban-rural differences in breeding of A. aegypti. However, many of these factors vary substantially between studies and in their degree of association with vector breeding, therefore they may not be reliable indices for vector control interventions. Conclusions Although containers in urban areas were more likely to be infested with A. aegypti, rural containers still provide suitable habitats for A. aegypti. Containers that are washed more frequent are less likely to produce A. aegypti. These results highlight the importance of container washing as an effective vector control tool in both urban and rural areas. In addition, alternative designs of the highly productive washbasins should continue to be explored. To control diseases such as dengue, Zika and chikungunya, effective vector breeding site control must be implemented in addition to other interventions.spa
dc.rights.localAcceso abiertospa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.accessrightshttp://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf242spa
dc.date.issued2017


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International