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dc.contributor.authorHamouti, Nassim
dc.contributor.authorDel Coso, Juan
dc.contributor.authorÁvila, Andrea
dc.contributor.authorMora-Rodriguez, Ricardo
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-01T16:55:55Z
dc.date.available2021-02-01T16:55:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12495/5228
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherSpringer Linkspa
dc.relation.ispartofseriesEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology, 1439-6327, Vol. 109, No. 2, 2010, p. 213-219spa
dc.relation.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s00421-009-1333-xspa
dc.titleEffects of athletes' muscle mass on urinary markers of hydration statusspa
dc.type.localArtículo de revista
dc.subject.keywordsBlood serum osmolalityspa
dc.subject.keywordsHypohydrationspa
dc.subject.keywordsUrine osmolalityspa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00421-009-1333-xspa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.publisher.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiologyspa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501
dc.type.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.instnameinstname:Universidad El Bosque
dc.identifier.reponamereponame:Repositorio Institucional Universidad El Bosque
dc.identifier.repourlrepourl:https://repositorio.unbosque.edu.co
dc.title.translatedEffects of athletes' muscle mass on urinary markers of hydration statusspa
dc.description.abstractenglishTo determine if athletes’ muscle mass affects the usefulness of urine specific gravity (U sg) as a hydration index. Nine rugby players and nine endurance runners differing in the amount of muscle mass (42 ± 6 vs. 32 ± 3 kg, respectively; P = 0.0002) were recruited. At waking during six consecutive days, urine was collected for U sg analysis, urine osmolality (U osm), electrolytes (U[Na+], U[K+] and U[Cl−]) and protein metabolites (U [Creatinine], U [Urea] and U [Uric acid]) concentrations. In addition, fasting blood serum osmolality (S osm) was measured on the sixth day. As averaged during 6 days, U sg (1.021 ± 0.002 vs. 1.016 ± 0.001), U osm (702 ± 56 vs. 554 ± 41 mOsmol kg−1 H2O), U [Urea] (405 ± 36 vs. 302 ± 23 mmol L−1) and U [Uric acid] (2.7 ± 0.3 vs. 1.7 ± 0.2 mmol L−1) were higher in rugby players than runners (P < 0.05). However, urine electrolyte concentrations were not different between groups. A higher percentage of rugby players than runners (56 vs. 11%; P = 0.03) could be cataloged as hypohydrated by U sg (i.e., >1.020) despite S osm being below 290 mOsmol kg−1 H2O in all participants. A positive correlation was found between muscle mass and urine protein metabolites (r = 0.47; P = 0.04) and between urine protein metabolites and U sg (r = 0.92; P < 0.0001). In summary, U sg specificity to detect hypohydration was reduced in athletes with large muscle mass. Our data suggest that athletes with large muscle mass (i.e., rugby players) are prone to be incorrectly classified as hypohydrated based on U sg.spa
dc.rights.accessrightshttp://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf2
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.accessrightsAcceso abiertospa
dc.rights.creativecommons2010


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