Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorVelásquez Riaño, Möritz
dc.contributor.authorBojacá Bautista, Vivian Andrea
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-09T19:09:04Z
dc.date.available2020-07-09T19:09:04Z
dc.identifier.issn0969-0239spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12495/3386
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.publisherSpringer Naturespa
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCellulose, 0969-0239, Vol. 24, Nro. 7, 2017, p. 2677-2698spa
dc.relation.urihttps://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10570-017-1309-7spa
dc.titleProduction of bacterial cellulose from alternative low-cost substratesspa
dc.type.localArtículo de revista
dc.subject.decsBiopolímerosspa
dc.subject.decsCelulosaspa
dc.subject.decsProducción de productosspa
dc.subject.keywordsBacterial cellulosespa
dc.subject.keywordsAcetobacter xilynumspa
dc.subject.keywordsGluconacetobacter xylinusspa
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10570-017-1309-7spa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.publisher.journalCellulosespa
dc.type.coarhttp://purl.org/coar/resource_type/c_6501
dc.type.driverinfo:eu-repo/semantics/article
dc.identifier.instnameinstname:Universidad El Bosque
dc.identifier.reponamereponame:Repositorio Institucional Universidad El Bosque
dc.identifier.repourlhttps://repositorio.unbosque.edu.co
dc.title.translatedProduction of bacterial cellulose from alternative low-cost substratesspa
dc.description.abstractenglishCellulose is the most widely used biopolymer on Earth. Its large-scale production is mainly from lignocellulosic material (plant origin), however, this plant material is not the only source of this valuable polymer, since microorganisms, like bacteria, naturally produce cellulose, especially those of the genus Komagateibacter (formerly Gluconacetobacter). This type of cellulose is of great interest because of its unique properties such as high purity and resistance, nevertheless, it has not been produced in a large-scale industrial process to date using low-cost substrates, one of the key aspects that should be considered for the industrial obtaining of any biotechnological product. As a main finding we found that the majority of low-cost culture media discussed could have the potential to produce bacterial cellulose on an industrial scale, since in most cases they yield more cellulose (with similar physical chemical characteristics) to those obtained in standard media. However, for an appropriate large-scale production, a specific knowledge about these by-products (since their composition and characteristics, which have a direct impact on the productivity of this biopolymer, are quite heterogeneous) and a proper standardization of them would also be required. Research staff of many industries could use the information presented here to help design a process to use their respective byproducts as substrate to obtain a product with a high added value as bacterial cellulose.spa
dc.rights.accessrightshttp://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf2
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess
dc.rights.accessrightsAcceso abiertospa
dc.date.issued2017-04-27


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record