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dc.contributor.authorWatkins, Christopher D.
dc.contributor.authorLeongómez, Juan David
dc.contributor.authorBovet, Jeanne
dc.contributor.authorKorbmacher, Max
dc.contributor.authorCorréa Varella, Marco António
dc.contributor.authorFernandez, Ana Maria
dc.contributor.authorWagstaff, Danielle
dc.contributor.authorBolgan, Samuela
dc.contributor.authorŻelaźniewicz, Agnieszka
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-12T21:44:36Z
dc.date.available2019-09-12T21:44:36Z
dc.identifier.issn2045-2322spa
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12495/1675
dc.description.abstractRomantic mouth-to-mouth kissing is culturally widespread, although not a human universal, and may play a functional role in assessing partner health and maintaining long-term pair bonds. Use and appreciation of kissing may therefore vary according to whether the environment places a premium on good health and partner investment. Here, we test for cultural variation (13 countries from six continents) in these behaviours/attitudes according to national health (historical pathogen prevalence) and both absolute (GDP) and relative wealth (GINI). Our data reveal that kissing is valued more in established relationships than it is valued during courtship. Also, consistent with the pair bonding hypothesis of the function of romantic kissing, relative poverty (income inequality) predicts frequency of kissing across romantic relationships. When aggregated, the predicted relationship between income inequality and kissing frequency (r = 0.67, BCa 95% CI[0.32,0.89]) was over five times the size of the null correlations between income inequality and frequency of hugging/cuddling and sex. As social complexity requires monitoring resource competition among large groups and predicts kissing prevalence in remote societies, this gesture may be important in the maintenance of long-term pair bonds in specific environments.spa
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdfspa
dc.language.isoengspa
dc.publisherNature Publishing Groupspa
dc.relation.ispartofseriesScientific Reports, 2045-2322, Vol.9, 2019, p. 1-9spa
dc.relation.urihttps://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-019-43267-7spa
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.titleNational income inequality predicts cultural variation in mouth to mouth kissingspa
dc.typearticlespa
dc.type.localartículospa
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-019-43267-7spa
dc.subject.armarcPoblación -- Estudios interculturalesspa
dc.subject.armarcPolítica socialspa
dc.subject.armarcRelaciones humanasspa
dc.type.hasversioninfo:eu-repo/semantics/publishedVersion
dc.publisher.journalScientific Reportsspa
dc.identifier.instnameinstname:Universidad El Bosquespa
dc.identifier.reponamereponame: Repositorio Institucional Universidad El Bosquespa
dc.identifier.repourlrepourl:https://repositorio.unbosque.edu.cospa
dc.rights.localAcceso abiertospa
dc.rights.accessrightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/openAccessspa
dc.rights.accessrightshttp://purl.org/coar/access_right/c_abf354spa
dc.date.issued2019


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 4.0 International